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The recruitment and retention of black and minority ethnic staff in the National Health Service

Black and minority ethnic staff are not only disproportionately represented within the NHS, but are also more likely to experience discrimination at work, especially if they are overseas-qualified. This paper argues that although there has been a concerted effort to combat racial discrimination at the national level, the evidence on the impact of policies aimed at facilitating the recruitment and retention of black and minority ethnic staff is mixed.

Key messages:

  • The UK labour market is characterised by discrimination against black and minority ethnic people
  • The representation of minority ethnic staff within the NHS is disproportionate and minority ethnic
  • Black and minority ethnic staff experience discrimination at work and in their careers
  • Overseas-qualified doctors and nurses are more likely to be discriminated against
  • There is concerted effort to combat racial discrimination at the national level
  • The evidence on the impact of policies aimed at facilitating the recruitment and retention of black and minority ethnic staff is mixed

Sections:

  • The UK labour market is characterised by discrimination against black and minority ethnic people
  • The representation of minority ethnic staff within the NHS is disproportionate and minority ethnic
  • Black and minority ethnic staff experience discrimination at work and in their careers
  • Overseas-qualified doctors and nurses are more likely to be discriminated against
  • There is concerted effort to combat racial discrimination at the national level
  • The evidence on the impact of policies aimed at facilitating the recruitment and retention of black and minority ethnic staff is mixed
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Author(s): Franklin Oikelome
Briefing series: Better Health Briefing Paper 4
Publisher: Race Equality Foundation
Publication date:  March 2007